Sunday, June 27, 2010

The G6 Summit.


It is extraordinary what I can see through my office window. In the water today, the seals bob up and grin and disappear under the water again.

Ah, there's lots of fish out there obviously.

Next, nearer the shore, there are the loons. Three of them hang out together all the time. I wonder at this arrangement they have made. Loons are normally in pairs. One must be a widow then, or a widower and the others include her in their soft shoe paddles around the bay. So she's not too lonely.

On the shore, the gulls congregate, grabbing at the leftovers washed in by the tide maintaining a respectful distance from the loons.

On my front lawn the robins gather around the feeder as the ravens (who aren't aware that they're so much bigger) await up in the trees on their leftovers.

On the deck are the blue jays hopping around just for the hell of it.

Pacing up and down at the sides of the house, ever watchful, are the juncoes, like security guards, pecking at the odd worm, seeming to march in step with each other.

And they all have their own sounds and allow each other the time to chirp and crawk.

Us pathetic humans could learn so much from all these accommodations. None of these birds get into conflict. Ever.

12 comments:

  1. The animal kingdom is an amazingly peaceful world, isn't it, compared to us.

    ReplyDelete
  2. First of all, I wish I had your office window. Secondly, you are so right about animals and us. We think we are so advanced but we could certainly learn from them. You made that point beautifully.

    ReplyDelete
  3. I think I could enjoy being a bird. It would certainly avoid all the violence and hatred and self-destruction humans are so fond of. And what a wonderful sensation it must be, gliding along on the air currents far above the madding crowd.

    ReplyDelete
  4. You've got a special piece of the universe there www. I know you treasure it and you give us the opportunity to enjoy it through your words. Thanks.

    ReplyDelete
  5. @Nora:
    We should be curled up at their feet learning how to do it!
    @Marcia:
    I feel truly lucky having a window on all this peace and learning how to live!
    @GM:
    It brings peace to the soul!
    @Nick:
    As a child I would fantasize about this and some of my best dreams incorporate flying!
    @VP:
    It is an extraordinary spot and I never tire of taking pictures of it to share it with the rest of the world!
    XO
    WWW

    ReplyDelete
  6. Your view sounds absolutely idyllic!

    (Though I have to admit, I'm a bit tired and I misread your third to last paragraph (having just read your posts about the G20) as
    "Pacing up and down at the sides of the house, ever watchful, are the security guards, pecking at the odd worm, seeming to march in step with each other."
    It raised a lovely image in my mind!)

    ReplyDelete
  7. We have backyard birds aplenty here, and even in this belligerent US they manage to mingle with little wrangling - Mourning Doves occasionally get a bit bad tempered.

    I envy your view of the water though WWW.....so gorgeously BLUE!!!

    ReplyDelete
  8. Jo:
    I feel right spoiled living here - and no my security guards are ankle-height, LOL!
    XO
    WWW

    ReplyDelete
  9. T:
    I miss the mourning doves and their soft calls. I had a nest under my bedroom window in one of my houses, I had a front row seat on their nest fixings and hatchings.
    Yes I've seen your pics of your back garden, paradise.
    XO
    WWW

    ReplyDelete
  10. Sounds idyllic, WWW. I'm afraid Ontario birds are a different kettle of fish (birds?) altogether. I had to get rid of the humming bird feeder because I got so fed up of watching them fight unto the death for a sip of nectar. Pretty as all get out, but a nasty quarrelsome breed too. And I have watched with amazement a cloud of tiny little yaller things (finches, perhaps?) gang up on a lone robin and chase it away, squawking and pecking like a gaggle of parish biddies. There must be something in the Newfoundland water that breeds detente among your avian neighbours. xoT

    ReplyDelete
  11. Tessa:
    Yes, I remember some savagery around my Ontario houses! That is so sad about the wee hummingbirds.
    I've never seen a bird fight here, even when the Northern Flicker landed one time on the grass in all her (his?) glory and went for the feeders in a big way. Could be the good sea air!
    XO
    WWW

    ReplyDelete

Some of you are having trouble, I've removed captcha and verification so we'll see how that goes. My apologies. Blogger is putting up far too many roadblocks. Thanks for the emails alerting me.
wisewebwomanatgmail.com