Wednesday, July 21, 2010

Reasons for Moving to Newfoundland (1) The Basics


A few of my readers have asked me the reasons I moved here from a large metropolis which holds some of my family, my friends, my interests (opera,symphony, theatre, art galleries, museums, etc.), my clients and writing colleagues.

There came a time when I'd seen all the operas I wanted to see - some five times - different productions of course. I'd been fortunate enough to attend all of Beethoven's symphonies one year for instance. I'd seen extraordinary curated exhibitions at the Royal Ontario Museum and saw and heard Handel's Water Music on a barge on the Avon River in Stratford, Ontario and the 1812 Overture and the Everly Brothers at Ontario Place.

I didn't plan to come and live here. The place found me. When I first toured the Irish Loop with my granddaughter seven years ago now, I had this visceral feeling of certainty way down deep inside.
"This is where I must be."

I'm analytical by nature so I've attempted to get to the root of this.

There was the landscape of course. Very similar to my beloved West Cork. There was the ocean. There were the houses, all wood as if risen up from the ground beneath, much the way the deserted dwellings find their way back into the soil once again, leaving no trace. There were the bright painted surfaces in all the colours of the rainbow. There were the names of the places: Heart's Content, Heart's Delight, Come By Chance, Heart's Ease, Harbour Grace.

There were the faces of the people.
"I'm among my own," I thought.

Ah, the people. Even in my own beloved native land I've never known such people. It is as if they came here from there four hundred years ago and kept all that was good and strong, kind and caring, the music and the story-telling and community spirit. And threw away the rest.

Some would call it regressive not to care about what you do and what you have.

But out here on the edge of the Atlantic it brings me right back down to basics. The solid basics of my grandparents and their tiny community on the far other edge of the Atlantic.

30 comments:

  1. Nice post. If you talking like that, we may let you stay ;)

    ReplyDelete
  2. I think I would like it too. I went to art college in Halifax and shouldn't have ever left. I have boat building ancestors in Nova Scotia.
    Spent a year in Ireland too.

    ReplyDelete
  3. You have sold it to me! Enjoy your little piece of heaven.

    ReplyDelete
  4. How lucky that you chanced on just the place where you felt so at home. It obviously inspires you and energises you with its beauty and its people. Some unfortunate souls never find that spot.

    ReplyDelete
  5. I haven't quite put roots down in Ireland, though I'm content enough here for now, but your posts about Newfoundland and your beautiful photos of its landscape give me an urge to at least visit it once.

    ReplyDelete
  6. Zuleme:
    If you liked Halifax you would love here. My you certainly have travelled a bit!
    Welcome!
    XO
    WWW

    ReplyDelete
  7. GM:
    Something tells me you would really like it here, especially the kitchen parties with the music and the story telling!
    XO
    WWW

    ReplyDelete
  8. Nick:
    How true. Many just yearn and never know what for. I was so lucky to find it and just jump at it!
    XO
    WWW

    ReplyDelete
  9. Oh Stan!
    You have to wend your way here at some point.
    The linguistics alone would entrance you!
    XO
    WWW

    ReplyDelete
  10. Spectacular sunset!! Very similar to the ones we have here on Georgian Bay. Home is where the heart is ,eh.

    ReplyDelete
  11. To be able to live in a place that calls your name is a wonderful thing. I've lived in a number of places but where I am now speaks to me much the way you describe. Lucky us :)

    ReplyDelete
  12. You found a place you could call "home." You're lucky you ran into it, or was it meant to be? You found your destiny. I don't know if I found mine. I have to travel around a little bit first and then decide.

    ReplyDelete
  13. I'm happy for you, WWW. you followed your heart and the heart is never wrong.

    I've left mine in a couple of places over the years, but it bounces back. We're trying hard to feel at home where we now find ourselves, my heart and I. ;-)

    ReplyDelete
  14. One of these days I'll be on your doorstep if you keep on writing such enticing things.

    ReplyDelete
  15. GFB:
    Yes, Peter, Paul & Mary had this song about it, just lovely.
    Here's the link:

    http://www.sing365.com/music/lyric.nsf/home-is-where-the-heart-is-lyrics-peter-paul-mary/d2e9c37c8cfd47b248256a22002b32ed

    XO
    WWW

    ReplyDelete
  16. Pauline:
    Yes, we are very lucky, from what I glean, this doesn't happen for too many of us!
    XO
    WWW

    ReplyDelete
  17. Nora:
    I firmly believe that once we go out and about and explore these places come to us.
    XO
    WWW

    ReplyDelete
  18. Just finished a story "What is left the daughter" by Howard Norman.
    Halifax and it's people who are caught up in the events of WW11.
    Loved it!

    ReplyDelete
  19. T:
    It's odd that isn't it. I find all that free floating longing has left me. I truly did find 'home' in a place where one would think I'd never get to know anyone and now I've got more friends here than I can count.
    XO
    WWW

    ReplyDelete
  20. 20CW:
    And you would be more than welcome, lots of bedrooms and comfy beds!
    XO
    WWW

    ReplyDelete
  21. Which are all the operas? I am pretty sure I'll die before I see all the operas I want to see, even if no one ever composes another.

    ReplyDelete
  22. DO:
    My father took me to Madama Butterfly when I was 15 and I was hooked, so from then to age 60--I had 45 years of opera seasons (and was in some myself).
    I never did like Wagner or Britten so that eliminates a few ;^)
    But Beethoven, Handel, Verdi, Puccini saw all of their significant output plus some I can't recall.
    I was fortunate to live in cities that had opera seasons.
    XO
    WWW

    ReplyDelete
  23. Lived in Sweden too, and Montreal. Now we are in northern New Hampshire, where we have been for 34 years. My Swede thought it looked like Sweden. I love anything by the sea since I was born on Cape Cod.
    My husband was in Newfoundland on a motorcycle trip with a buddy. He says it is beautiful, he especially loved some valley which was tropical on one side and looked like a desert on the other (?)

    ReplyDelete
  24. Z:
    Yes, they say here is one of the best places in the world to motorcycle, I talked to a group from Mississipi who come here every single year to take advantage of the thrilling roads. I was stunned, to put it mildly, as that is one hell of a ride from there to here!
    I do believe your hubbie means the Codroy Valley?
    My g-daughter and I are heading there this year. That is if we're not sidetracked by other incredible places as we are wont to be in the past!!!
    XO
    WWW

    ReplyDelete
  25. Newfoundland is calling. I miss Ireland, but it seems easier to expat to Canada than to Ireland.

    ReplyDelete
  26. I am moving to Newfoundland, & feel called here much as you did. I'm moving to Woody Point on the west side, surrounded by Gros Morne National Park. I'm so inspired by the landscape & the people. Many of my family & friends think that I've lost my senses, but I know that I've just found them!

    ReplyDelete
  27. S:
    I hope you pay attention to the call!!
    XO
    WWW

    ReplyDelete
  28. Murdoch:
    Much the same as my clan felt about my move. Madness they said.
    But I can honestly say it is the best thing that ever happened to me.
    You can email me privately if you have further questions or need information, etc.
    wisewebwomanatgmaildotcom
    XO
    WWW

    ReplyDelete

Some of you are having trouble, I've removed captcha and verification so we'll see how that goes. My apologies. Blogger is putting up far too many roadblocks. Thanks for the emails alerting me.
wisewebwomanatgmail.com