Saturday, July 07, 2012

Gathering, Guarding and Grooming



Strange society we live in, yeah? So much time wasted on the gathering, grooming and guarding of stuff. Seriously.

No longer are we just living with essentials that no one would bother to look twice at in yesteryear, much less envy and want to steal.

I was tweaked to this post by one of Grannymar's today where she has this picture of a tricycle behind a locked tall gate. A chilling shot, to my mind. So much is said or understood by the objects portrayed - the prison of today's childhood, the concrete, the limited range for riding the bike itself, the sterile suburb.

I come from an unlocked door mentality. I know, I know. I had one breakin back in the day when we lived in the sprawling marital century home. One that was locked. And thieves broke into it through the dining room window and stole what they could, my purse, my ID and credit cards, they missed the family silver, what there was of it and other antiques.

Ever since then, call me a lunatic, I haven't bothered locking except when I go on vacation.

You see, something fires up inside me when such things happen. I was attacked one night when I was out running, police told me not to run at night, well, you know, eff them all, I'm taking back my night. And I did.

So I lived in Toronto for many, many years with unlocked doors, except at night - you know transients, etc. - and never had a problem. My take is thieves wouldn't bother. If you don't lock your door what's there to steal? If you do there must be treasure inside. Friends up the street proved my point in Toronto. Robbed blind after the tiny kitchen window was broken.

Batshyte crazy?

Probably.

But you knew that.


24 comments:

  1. That is a very interesting reaction to Grannymar's photograph. Odd how different minds think differently to the same stimulus.Mine took off on a nostalgia trip!

    I too am of the opinion that the less you protect the less you are vulnerable. I had a great deal of convincing to do when my father moved in with me that there was nothing of significant value in our home for thieves to be interested. He would simply go around double checking all doors and windows. I suppose that it is also due to mentalities of abundance and shortage influencing behaviour differently.

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  2. And also I believe, Ramana, that attachment can really hinder our personal happiness.

    We have to work on what we are attached to.

    Yes, I understand Papa, my father was the same. I like your take on that.

    XO
    WWW

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  3. The more you have, the more you stand to lose. But I still lock up at night. I've experienced two break-ins, both of them quite a long time ago. One was an inside job: someone who lived in the house decided to steal the collected rent money and flee.

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  4. I came across several views like that during my ten days in Dublin. I stayed with my sister in the house where I was born, nowadays there are young families in the houses around her, yet I only heard the sound of children in any of the gardens on one occasion.

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  5. Stan:
    The "having" perhaps is the problem. Oh I still lock up at night but never doing the day no matter where I am.
    Inside jobs remind me of family, we are in more danger from them than from perfect strangers.
    XO
    WWW

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  6. GM:
    I've been struck by that scene here too, particularly when I house-sat in the 'burbs. Nary a child, nary a sidewalk, just everyone incarcerated behind darkened house fronts.
    What's wrong with us all?
    XO
    WWW

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  7. Leaving your door unlocked is a sign of incurable optimism and a belief in the basic goodness of people. I concur with the optimism, but I've been disabused of the latter notion.
    In the dear dead dinosaur days I roamed free and no one worried; not smart today.

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  8. My father is horrified each and every time he visits when I do not lock up my house before venturing out in the big city of Toronto. And he is doubly horrified that I never lock up my car in my driveway. Ever.

    It is strange that two people who left most of their stuff behind to embark on a new life in a new country could have such opposite feelings on the matter of stuff and security of said stuff isn't it?

    xo

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  9. There have been times in my life when locking the door of my abode didn't even enter my mind, nothing untoward ever happened at those times - but that was long, long ago. Now I keep doors locked all the time, day and night. During the day it's not really necessary but I feel better - stranger in a strange land and all that! ;-)

    Himself told me that he hardly ever locked his doors a few years ago, and nor did many others in this area. Times change, people change. Now most of 'em will have a gun behind their front doors.
    ;-(

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  10. Marc:
    I think what we put out there is what is returned. Pollyanna that I am, lol.

    I honestly believe that the percentage of evil-doers out there does not change.

    I think our silly accumulation of stuff has, and perhaps the appalling inequality of living in today's world entices those who suffer.

    XO
    WWW

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  11. Orla:
    What was that again about subtraction - the more we subtract from our lives, the happier we are.

    We never own the stuff, the stuff owns us.

    XO
    WWW

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  12. T:

    So very sad to hear this. We are all prisoners, to one degree or another.

    What has changed? Crime rates haven't. Is it the constant flow of crime news on TV screens, web and newspapers?

    H'm

    XO
    WWW

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  13. George Carlin's wonderful take on "stuff" is worth a lookup on YouTube. One of the joys of getting older is the learning that less is more. We came in naked and we leave the same way.

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  14. We always keep the front door locked during the day but not the back door. Force of habit really because this area is remarkably crime-free. We sometimes leave the front door unlocked accidentally but have never been burgled. There's very little of value in the house, as any would-be burglar could deduce by looking in the front windows and looking at our ancient cars.

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  15. Anon:

    Oh that GC Stuff thing, I just love. Especially the bit where he goes away for a weekend when he's on vacation and has to condense his condensed stuff. LOL

    Yes I practise subtraction too!!
    XO
    WWW

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  16. Nick:
    For a second I thought your ancient cars were the only furnishings of your living room until I re-read. LOL, I had a shuckle.
    yes, burglars would probably donate to me if they barged their way in here, lol.
    XO
    WWW

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  17. I'm a secondhand girl; most of my belongings have come from the Transfer Station (aptly named since I transfer stuff from there to here). It's amazing what people throw away! I'm of the mind that if someone is determined to break in, they'll find a way, locked door or no. If someone needs my junk more than I do, they can have it. All they really need to do is ask, really.

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  18. I'm with you Pauline, we could be twins.
    XO
    WWW

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  19. Don't keep your doors locked? Well meet
    the guy that relieves his bowels on your bed or beds or how about his buddy that likes to urinate on your favourite chair and other furniture can't forget his cousin who will relieve you of your prescription drugs and your butcher knives and last but not least wally wanker who gets off masturbating onto the lady of the house's knickers from her drawer.
    Any loose money,laptops,cellphones,credit cards are just a bonus.

    All this info courtesy the police officers in our family.

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  20. I'm with you. I think if someone wants to get in, they will. I do lock my doors at night these days, but not in the day and I really object to having to lock my car when I'm out and about. It gets very hot in the summer here (OZ) and I used to always leave my windows down. I have nothing that I would fight to keep from losing - except family members. Things are just things.
    Often it reaches the point where people don't own things - the things own the people. I sometimes think there's a competition on; whoever has the most stuff when they die, wins.

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  21. Manifestation, GFB, what we're most afraid of happens. I've witnessed it over and over again.
    XO
    WWW

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  22. Sue~
    Welcome!
    I totally agree on stuff owing people.
    And as to weirdos, I saw enough pervs when I was a child, I think my quota is up. :)
    I refuse to go around and live in fear.
    XO
    WWW

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  23. Good for you being undaunted - though I'd turn the key anyway, just to make it a little harder.

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  24. Crimes of opportunity are aplenty in a community plagued by addictions to drugs and alcohol along with a lack of education and opportunities. I keep my gate locked. This said I had not locked my beloved scooter and it got stolen more then 4 years ago and a week ago I was the puzzled receiver of a parking violation citation. I want MY scooter back!

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