Monday, October 29, 2012

My People



Morning view from the deck of my cabin - click to embiggen and gasp.


Albert Einstein once said, “I lived in solitude in the country and noticed how the monotony of a quiet life stimulates the creative mind.”
 
I would add and being with other writers. Let's face it. Only writers understand other writers. At the very least other writers don't glaze over as we expound on plot and character and the placement of a comma. Truly.
 
I had a week of this. Of workshops. Of best-selling authors reading my work. Of salons (oh, the salons!). Of wonderful food and formulating words. Words on the hoof after a long woodland walk with "my team". Words in the long night in front of the fire unkinking and rekinking chapters and paragraphs and sentences. Words spoken from the podium where our characters came alive. One of our leading Canadian poets showing his stand-up comic side before launching into his paeans to rocks and birds and all matter in between. One of our quieter writers astonishing us with her wit as we fall into helpless laughter.
 
We came from all over, New York, the hinterlands of British Columbia, Northern Ontario, West Virginia, Ireland (me). Our ages ranged from early twenties to (I estimate) mid seventies. Many of us had lived in exotic places. Many of us had challenging day jobs - nuclear physicist, farmer, lawyer.
 
All of us were there for the love of writing, wanting to share, wanting to listen.
 
Wanting to celebrate the sheer bliss of it all.
 




20 comments:


  1. I think that I mentioned before here ,how similar the scenery where you are is to where I am.

    Glad that the work shop was so stimulating for you.

    I would agree with old Al but add that a glass or two of the suds is a fine augmentation also :)

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  2. Gawd, GFB, you wouldn't want to see me start in on those suds.

    I've already drunk 10 lifetimes worth, LOL.

    Do it for me.

    XO
    WWW

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  3. That sounds just wonderful. Now relive the feeling every time you sit to write.

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  4. I made my first story at nine, first poem at 15.

    I wrote and edited newspapers for 25 years.

    And then the world got in my way; I stopped.

    On retiring, the need returned; poetry, essays, a memoir, a novel, a second one begun.

    I share your joy and enthusiasm for the craft.

    This part of life was awaiting my return.

    The work, not its value, is at issue.

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  5. I haven't been to a writers' workshop in years. That one sounds good. There was a flurry of interest in such workshops in Hawaii a while ago but not lately. I think lack of support for creative activities in u.s. is a factor. Writer friends have to earn a living other ways. My favorite local authornow sews craft items and makes ceramics to sell. No one subsidizes the arts.

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  6. Marc:
    "The work, not its value, is at issue."
    I share your thoughts on this. I was writing from a tender age (1st play at 7)
    and never stopped. But life got in the way and I did not pursue.
    It is soooo so good to be back in the saddle with others of my ilk.
    XO
    WWW

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  7. Hattie
    Much the same in Canada with Harper at the helm. All sorts of funding cuts.
    It is a crime.
    we have to dream up alternatives to sustain us through the dark winters of our paragraphs.
    XO
    WWW

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  8. What a gorgeous spot to nurture the mind and soul.

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  9. SAW:
    Spectacular. I could have spent a month there.
    XO
    WWW

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  10. And I presume a lot of new and creative writing came out of such an inspiring week?

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  11. Absolutely Nick. It is amazing what such an environment does!!
    XO
    WWW

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  12. Beautiful view. And the workshops sound great; I'm delighted to hear you got so much out of it.

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  13. Thank you Stan, I love these kind of surprises when you take away far more than you brought!!
    XO
    WWW

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  14. Sounds wonderful Wise - I look forward to the rewards in words. Maybe we [your readers] should send you wee life stories and you could make of them what you will. Privately of course!
    take care,
    Betty

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  15. Not a bad idea at all BB - real life inspires all my endeavours, and truth is far stranger than fiction!!
    XO
    WWW

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  16. I love to listen to other writers describe how they go about it. I'm thrilled when someone can point out where my plot is going astray. I'm completely offended when someone criticizes my word choice. Uh...

    On an unrelated note, I happen to know how to pronounce Newfoundland. I was drilled.

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  17. Murr:
    You would have died laughing if you'd heard me drilling so many during the week as to how to say it correctly.
    I'd say "Time for another lesson" and they'd all obediently line up as I'd say over and over "Newfoundland. Understand."
    XO
    WWW

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  18. Pauline:
    And if you think this is heaven you'd have been totally welcome there - maybe apply next year?
    XO
    WWW

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