Sunday, August 09, 2015

Blog Jam


Ansa's getting old. Really old. Bad incident last night with her bleeding from her mouth all over the downstairs. I think her cataracts cause her to bump into things. At first I thought it was another animal attack outside but there were no scratches on her face and I think she pierced her lip with a tooth when she ran into something in her 2 minutes out of my sight. I can't get near her jaw to check.

Tonight she got stuck on the floor. I'm not an engineer and she's a heavy dog + bad back here too. I tried a sling with a sheet and then as she licks my hand (gawd, it breaks your heart it does) I heave upwards with her back end and she lets me. We are both weepy from the indignity and the effort. Problem solved. For now. I've now banned her from the office as she won't walk on the rugs laid down all over it. Dog are like that, delicately stepping around all safety measures. She's on the back hall big rug now. I may have to fence her in a little more.

Meanwhile my PG* has fallen so deeply in love with Newfoundland he's bought a house here and is not going back to the U.S. but is outsourcing the sale and disposal of his properties in Massachusetts. Imagine. I don't think it's my delicate crepes for breakfast or my wee Tigeen doing the trick but how lovely. He is enchanted. As I was and am. The fairies got him too, as the saying goes.

We have our big community midday dinner tomorrow. Hot turkey meal, veggies, dessert, tea/coffee all for $12.00. I mean seriously. I couldn't cook it for that.

I made an old recipe from Ireland tonight. It was served in spring when there were more winter onions than they knew what to do with left over hanging from the rafters in the barns and sheds, so they'd be incorporated into a lovely whole wheat bread. Lashings of them. Usually served for breakfast with an egg or two. The carmelized onions sit on the bottom of the pan when you stick the loaf in the oven and then they swim their way through the bread, some breaking rhrough the top. Heav-en-lee.

*Paying guest

12 comments:

  1. That's intriguing that your paying guest has totally fallen in love with Newfoundland and is staying there permanently. I wonder what brought that on? A combination of the friendly locals and the amazing landscapes would be my guess.

    Poor Ansa, sounds like she's in a bad way. I hope she doesn't do herself a serious injury.

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  2. It is difficult watching an old dog suffer, I saw my sister go through that pain at the beginning of the year. Gosh, I have often wondered what it would be like to turn the key, walk away and never look back. I look forward to hear the next chapter.

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  3. I might just give that onion bread a try next time I bake!
    Sorry to hear about Ansa. That's rough. My old dog has trouble keeping up with me on our walks now; she's limpy. At other times she bounds about like a pup. It's confusing!
    Sweet that your PG fell in love with the island.
    xo
    Kate

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  4. Nick:
    Like what happened to me. An absolutely visceral connection, he and I've talked about this and recognise that very few people feel that about "home". As in the "home" most crave. Nothing to do with family, tribe or country. Just an instinct, very hard to describe.
    XO
    WWW

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  5. GM:
    I've never done quite that but yes, to walk away and not look back is a fascination I have too. I think you've given me an idea for a short story. Thanks missus!
    XO
    WWW

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  6. SJG:
    It's an amazing bread, the onions give it this unusual sweetness. And whole wheat healthy :)
    Ah your poor wee puppy. I've taken to following Ansa around, I love the way dogs drift around. Mine loves to smell all the roses, one by one. I don't know what she's thinking about when she does this. Maybe sucking in summer deep into her lungs.
    I'm enjoying her so much, bitter sweet.
    You know what I'm sayin'.
    XO
    WWW

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  7. Your bread sounds divine. I love cartelized onions with most anything.

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  8. DKZ - it surely is :)And easy, so easy.

    XO
    WWW

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  9. I've been there where you are with Ansa and though it's a time of deep love, it is heartbreaking to have to count the time, the days, with them. It's even harder to do it alone without some stronger arms to help with lifting when necessary. How wonderful that Ansa knows and feels, and appreciates your love, ---and shows her love, too.

    Your bread looks and sounds great!
    Nancy

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  10. Thanks Nancy, yes I've been there before too and it doesn't get easier it actually gets worse as it has been a pretty dreadful year of loss for me and I do wonder if I will be now dogless, you know? And Ansa, amongst all my dogs is "The One".
    XO
    WWW

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  11. At this time I can't imagine being without a dog. I'm 78. I've had Koco for going on four years. She will be six next March. I dread the day that may come. A dog is more than a pet. She gives us a purpose, --to get up and take care of her, she's a companion, she offers protection, she alerts me to things going on that I might miss, --she notices everything. I feel like I need a dog. --I'm thinking of you and Ansa. --Nancy

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  12. Me too Nancy, no matter what happens a dog has basically always been part of my life.It's hard to explain it to non-dog lovers.
    XO
    WWW

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