Monday, February 01, 2016

Life in my Village - a snapshot.

I never need a tracking device because people find me. All.The.Time.

Case in point was today where I was conducting a writers' workshop. In the middle of it, Roger, our old postmaster (he had a rather stupid tussle with a Big Gun at the main post office in town and lost the service) called me out of it with one of those secret agent beckoning fingers along with a shhh on the lips. As he is also the honorary fire chief, I thought it to be an emergency of some kind.

"Drove all the way up here, couldn't find your car anywhere near your house (story of my life out here) and then I had to hunt you down," sez he, "I had a courier delivery for you, huge box - come down and get it, I can't lift it."

Ah yes, when a snowstorm hits, I order groceries by mail, free delivery over $50. Great service.

Assuring him, yes, I'd be down later not now, I resume the class.

On wrapping up the class an hour later, and locking up the building, I notice a jeep with one of our elders in it, obviously waiting for me.

"Ah yes," sez Mr. Francis through his lowered window, "Finally! I've been waiting for over half an hour. I had to track you down!"

"What?" sez I, "Another delivery?"

He looks at me baffled. "Ah no, no, girl,(it's always lovely to be called a girl when you're an elder yourself and he or she is 16 years older) I've been worried about the ice dams on your house, I took the liberty of checking the outside and I'd sleep easier if you could have an engineer look at it, to make sure there's no structural damage after the melt, know what I mean?"

It has taken me quite a while to get used to these invasions at all times, no matter where I am. Coming from cities (Cork, Toronto)it's all part of my adjustment to rural living. Everyone knows where you are and what boxes lie in wait for you and what's happened to your house, your family or your dog.

I wouldn't go back for anything.



23 comments:

  1. Replies
    1. Only on reflection do I see what a loving life it is E this sort of thing would have annoyed the hell out of me 10 years ago. It took me a long time to adjust.
      XO
      WWW

      Delete
  2. Caught up with your back catalogue; having too much to do to go into details on individual posts, but delighted, as always, to be given a glimpse of your life, a life lived by a lady whom I would dearly love to meet elsewhere.

    My village is much the same as yours, everybody knows everybody’s business but everybody (or many, anyway) are happy to help when things get rough or when small concerns cause the kind of curiosity that is all friendly rather than just nosy.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks Friko! Meeting you IRL would be a pleasure!
      It's this caring I love. Mr F having sleepless nights worried But my house. A few years back he was worried about my outside lamp which dimmed and floodlit on a motion sensor. He wanted to rewire my house as he thought it was faulty!!
      XO
      WWW

      Delete
  3. I would love it and have them all over for coffee.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. We chat over coffee in our newly opened cyber café Sharyn. And at the library.
      XO
      WWW

      Delete
  4. I could get used to being found like that too!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yes it took me a while Ramana but now I love it
      XO
      WWw

      Delete
  5. My neighbours know all about me, what they do not know, they make up! I have hobbled out my front door, after a fall and asked a neighbour if there was any chance he could drive me to the hospital. "No, I cannot, I am far to busy and there is no point in asking my wife, she is busy too." he said. Of the twenty bungalows in our small estate, there is one girl who I can call on and she will check up on me if she has not seen me for a few days. One good neighbour is worth more than twenty others who only want me when I can do something for them. I do not lower my self to their level and always help where I can.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I am appalled you would be treated that way GM.it sounds so alien to me now but there were "peculiars" like that in places I've lived too. Always at the door with complaints but never in charity or compassion.
      XO
      WWW

      Delete
  6. Some years ago I stopped by the local liquor store. The clerk then was Cathy, a middle aged woman who had been working there for years. Three or four other shoppers were in the store when I entered. Cathy looked up and saw me. "Here's doc, gettin' his bottle of whiskey." she announced. I smiled, waved to the other customers.
    Small town life.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I hope you treated them to a bit of a stagger and a hiccup Mike? :)
      XO
      WWW

      Delete
  7. If things were different in my life, I would move to your wonderful town in a heartbeat. It's just like the one I grew up in.....how lucky you are. Enjoy every loving minute. Dee

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Dee it truly is such a kind and caring place though we can have our tussles at council meetings from the old guard!
      XO
      WWW

      Delete
  8. Not sure how I would adjust if I lived in a small village where everyone knew my business and felt free to intrude on me at any time! After the privacy and anonymity of living in a large city, I think I would find it rather disturbing! But it's nice to know there are people who're looking out for you and will be quick to give you help if you need it.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It took a while for me too Nick. I think it's all about learning the rhythms of others and I do hang a sign on my door saying "writing!" When I need my solitary confinements. And this is always respected.
      XO
      WWW

      Delete
  9. Your last line made me smile. I live in a small(ish) town in Ohio where it is much the same way. Coming from the East Coast, it was definitely an adjustment. And I love it.

    Also love your blog....read it always!

    Elle

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you for commenting Elle. Small town life is great, once you get used to it.
      XO
      WWW

      Delete
  10. People here strike a nice balance between respecting each others' privacy and being friendly and available to help. A couple of days ago a neighbor did some mowing and weeding for us. A few weeks ago I made a meal for them when a family member was recuperating from a hospital stay. We watch out for each other.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. The best way to be I don't find it intrusive at all as my boundaries are respected.
      XO
      WWW

      Delete
  11. Glad you can enjoy your community. Am surrounded by mostly new much younger home owners often not around much. I miss some of those older ones who had been close friends, but not only did they move away, I've outlived them. But its worked out the new ones have been solicitous and had an occasion when I needed to seek help and a couple other times when I appreciated being checked on -- specially from the gals across the street. Like everything in life, there are pros and cons to small town and community life -- give and take.

    ReplyDelete
  12. I'm finding more pros as I age, Joared. The younger me would resent and misclassify interest as prurient curiosity, now I see it for concern and comparisons on the aging process. I am considered an expert on solo-living and a lot of these older women live in dread of when their husbands die off as many don't have drivers' licences and can't manage a woodstove or snow shovelling, etc.

    XO
    WWW

    ReplyDelete
  13. Dear Mrs.

    Do these GPS type things happen to your younger WWW too? The lovely blonde colleen, or only you.

    ReplyDelete

Some of you are having trouble, I've removed captcha and verification so we'll see how that goes. My apologies. Blogger is putting up far too many roadblocks. Thanks for the emails alerting me.
wisewebwomanatgmail.com