Saturday, September 29, 2012

An Unlove Story Part 3 of 3

See Part 1 here
See Part 2 here
 
 
Busy, she paid no attention to any of his doings for a couple of years until at odds with herself and the world one night, she stalked Connie on Facebook and, shocked, found a wall-post that stated that she and her love were moving to Newfoundland shortly.

No, she thought, Newfoundland is far too small for the both of us. Well, actually, three of us. She would trip over this man. She just knew she would.  The thought appalled her. And try as she might, she had difficulty placing the Jack she knew in Newfoundland. He and Newfoundland would be as two mismatched socks.

Connie posted frequent updates on the projected move. But something was off. She used 'I' a lot, not 'we'? H'm? She posted she'd been to Newfoundland in June and had fallen in love hopelessly and forever. She mused that she and Connie were kindred spirits, based on their shared feelings for Newfoundland. Connie announced that she'd upped and sold her house in Ontario in preparation for her move in September.

Then last week Connie celebrated her leaving of Ontario with an announcement of a champagne brunch attended by Bill and all her 'supportive' friends. Bill? A hitherto unmentioned son? A nephew? Why no mention of Jack?

Connie arrived in Newfoundland on Monday and posted on her wall for her friends and dearly loved 'supporters' in Ontario:
    “Got rid of the cheater, the liar, the stealer, the thief and the fraud, the deceiver.” 
and
“I'm now with my new love Bill, and loving my Newfoundland life.”


And all the pieces crashed into place. Every single last one. Her sense of relief was overwhelming. She felt fortunate she hadn't been similarly afflicted and abused. And that Connie had escaped so quickly.
 
She lit a candle in thanks to one who was long dead:

For her grandmother, who had imparted many truisms to her over her formative years, had once bestowed on her the best advice ever:

           "Never give your money to a man. For you will lose both your money and the man.”






22 comments:

  1. You are an extraordinary story teller. Even your non-story posts are written with clarity and wit. You never fail to interest or delight.

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  2. Your grandmother was a wise old bird and I know you listened well. I am glad you were rid of the cheater and all the rest of his failings. Stay strong my friend.

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  3. Marcia:
    And every word is true, I find truth so much more stranger than fiction in life...
    XO
    WWW

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  4. Pauline:

    *blush*, how kind of you to say this.

    I love storytelling (in the tradition of my people) and I am so glad you enjoy them!

    XO
    WWW

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  5. GM:

    Oh he was good, I never realized what his hidden agenda was at all. Connie caught on but I'm sure he took her for a lot.

    Names have been changed to protect the innocent.

    I'd like to see karma catch up with him though.

    XO
    WWW

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  6. My grandfather blew his inheritance on women. My father switched loyalties and his first wife and her children did not inherit anything from him. His mistress who became his second wife and her family took everything that he had. That family ditched him when she died.

    The advise could well have been different to a boy from his grandmother or mother WWW.

    A beautiful story nevertheless.

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  7. How different, Ramana? Not sure I follow.

    Perhaps giving your everything to a woman will mean you will lose it all?

    I do believe we need to keep something of ourselves to ourselves. I've always that that old maxim of "two becoming as one" was a load of hogwash and cringe when it is used in wedding services.

    It sounds like a bargain basement sale. :)

    XO
    WWW

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  8. Yes! Like leopards, they don't change their spots do they, WWW?
    Satisfying end to a good story, very well written - as always.
    :-)

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  9. What an eye opening ending to a terific story that was so well told. I'm glad for both the women but the narrator especially who came out relatively unharmed and all the more wiser. It's good to come out in the end without too many wounds. Saved by the bell she was.

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  10. T:

    No they don't change at all, in spite of all the wishes and hopes that they will, finding the 'right on' and all.

    Lucky escape indeed. For both.

    XO
    WWW

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  11. Thanks Irene, I am so glad you enjoyed it and applaud the ending.

    All true.

    XO
    WWW

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  12. Well, it only goes to show that however much a man like that pretends to be a decent, civilised guy, the truth will out sooner or later and the woman should get away fast.

    I'm glad Connie was smart enough to get out from under and start a new and better life in Newfoundland.

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  13. I enjoyed this story very much, and I'm relieved that the narrator and Connie both escaped the hold of this man. Many people experience depression: what matters is how and whether it's faced.

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  14. Awesome!! Loved the way you told this story and loved the relieved exhale at the end. How reassuring, and validating.

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  15. Nick:
    I am lost in admiration for Connie to tumble upon the truth so quickly but less for myself who had still had lingering feelings. Now no more. But an adjusted history which is quite painful.
    XO
    WWW

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  16. Stan:
    I think possibly his depression might have been related to not getting what he wanted (i.e. funding) don't you think?
    XO
    WWW

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  17. Heather:
    Oh the relief is immeasurably, put those "whatifs" to rest finally.

    It is the shared history that has to be adjusted and as I said above this is quite painful.

    XO
    WWW

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  18. I am sorry I did not come out as I intended. Your story talks about a man who tries to rip off a woman and all that I was trying to point out was that a woman could do the same to a man.

    If either my grandfather or my father could not hold on to his fortune, he deserved to lose and I have no complaints on that score.

    My grandmother or mother could have advised me "Never give your money to a woman. For you will lose both your money and the woman.”

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  19. Ha Ramana, OK, you have clarified. Yes, men get ripped off too. Particularly older men with younger women.

    Do they think these women love them for their looks and mental agility?

    I'm not saying that there are exceptions to the rules, of course.

    I know one such couple who have a 25 year age gap and are still in love after 25 years together.

    But a fool and his/her money are soon parted, n'est pas?

    Merci grandmama!

    XO
    WWW

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  20. I'm thinking of a point of view you gave recently about women being able to live on their own and feeling strong and liberated by that.

    Yes, it's good that Connie escaped....but into the arms of another - and so soon. It's a familiar strategy and one that prevents women from feeling truly independent for a while before they contemplate another relationship - if ever. (IMO, of course)

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  21. Oh Pamela, I thought of that too. She went searching so quickly it astonished me. Though I've known far too many like her. Never complete until a man is beside them.

    I evaluate the pricetag of those liaisons. I'm just not built that way!

    XO
    WWW

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