Sunday, May 05, 2013

Avast



There are some that are fearful of the vast quantities of time that can open up at one's feet and suck you in to nameless dreads and freefloating anxieties when the day job is no longer there to fill the vacuum. I know a few.

As I am wrapping up my own day job I begin to see this. Part of me is excited at not being so constricted by this career that spreads its ooze more times than I care to admit into my nights. Plus there are vast swathes of time where I see clients, talk to them, soothe them, answer questions throughout the year, plan with them, etc. Da Schmooze in other words. Part of any job be it MacDonald's or Google or Bill Gates is the ability to schmooze. It takes up a lot of time. For me anyway. Usually there's an average of one business email a day througout the year, then software updates, professional associations, webinars, continuous learning as tax regulations change and permutate.

I have to be wary of this final announcement to quit the business. I gently severed some clients last year, ones that were at a major geographical distance or their businesses were expanding rapidly but then, guess what? Some of them didn't settle my final billing to them. In spite of repeated requests. Bummer, yeah? So this year I am withholding this announcement from the balance of my clients until I'm paid. There's nowt as queer as folks, even clients who were friends tell me they'll pay me once they have the funds but meanwhile could I help their new accountant in the transition. What do you think? Put further work into the dead horse or walk away with my precious time?

I admit to feeling exhilaration at the idea of my life opening up afresh without the constant rattle of accounting in the background. I haven't knitted in ages. Or read a book in a day. Or visited my Writer's Cabin. Or meandered around my village in the afternoon. Or edited novels. Or work on the new play. Or....

I am ready. Avast!

21 comments:

  1. It's too bad that your final bills don't get settled and that you have no polite way to get it done. You would think that your former clients would not put you through such unease.

    I wish you lots of enjoyment with all the other endeavors that you will now have time for. I hope your life slows down to a very pleasant pace. There is so much in life to enjoy. Even the long minutes of silence.

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  2. Yes, the long moments of silence I do enjoy daily Irene as I practise meditation. But I am so looking forward to my play and writing and directing and all the rest of it that never feels like work, just bliss :)
    XO
    WWW

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  3. That always burns me - people who will say I've really helped them and then who refuse to acknowledge their bill. I could never do that to someone.

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  4. I hate owing anyone money and feel really annoyed when others neglect to pay me or undervalue my work.

    Enjoy the freedom and the time for new friendships. By that I include people, books, plays, travels and more time with Ansa.

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  5. Woo hoo! It worked! I am glad to be back in the fold once more. Thank you,WWW

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  6. Those who can, continue to; those who can't? Too bad. You're in the first category. I hear you!

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  7. It sounds like it'll be quite a relief to be free of all the time and effort and fee-chasing of the day job and have the chance to get stuck into something more creative and satisfying. Best of luck!

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  8. I don't understand people who stiff others. And oh the schmoozing. It's bad for one's character. What I like most about retirement is no longer having to deal with difficult people.

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  9. I think you're in fine shape, just recognizing the presence of the abyss--I've seen people scramble back from it, back into a job they don't like, just to avoid facing life. As much as I'd looked forward to retiring since I left high school (really!), I did recognize the odd levitation for the first few days, and the wondering when I would fall and whether it would hurt. It doesn't hurt. We do become more aware of our own death, but it seems silly not to. I am loving every minute.

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  10. I bet you'll have no trouble at all filling the time. As for getting paid what you're owed: I sympathise. I keep having to remind people about invoices I sent them months ago.

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  11. SAW:

    You'd possibly believe then, the bad debts losses of thousands and thousands of dollars I've endured. Even after taking clients to court. Court orders mean nothing to these thieves. And I still had to pay my sub-contractors.

    XO
    WWW

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  12. Thanks GM.

    I try not to cry over spilt milk but if I was paid all I'm owed my retirement would have been far far easier. :(

    XO
    WWW

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  13. GM:

    the odd spam is slipping through but worth it to have you here!!

    XO
    WWW

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  14. Nick:

    Part of it has been torture and some panic when I scratch around waiting for payment to pay MY bills!!

    Entrepreneurship has its rewards but the risks can be paralyzing.

    XO
    WWW

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  15. Hattie:

    Yes, the world of choice opens up, was just talking with someone about this this morning. We can choose the people we spend time with now. 'Swonderful!

    XO
    WWW

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  16. Murr:

    Once the office is cleaned up of all outstanding matters and files packed up and sent off, I'll be breathing better. With trepidation. But breathing.
    And anticipating. And excited.

    XO
    WWW

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  17. Stan:
    It takes a pile of energy chasing what is rightfully owed us. I don't understand people who expect their work done on time and in my case I get huge tax refunds for them and they don't split off a bit of it and pay me? Whut???

    XO
    WWW

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  18. A lot you share
    I have been there.
    Simple lifestyle at this time
    and love it...
    Follow your heart.

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  19. All the very best to you WWW. I hope that the Avast does not include your blogging.

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  20. Hi, this is my first visit here and I am on the other side of sixty also. I retired from a long career as a librarian in 2009 and adore being retired. You will adjust and love it, just make sure those clients pay you, like you said.

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