Sunday, June 15, 2014

Black and White and Denial all Over - Part 4


See Part 1 here
See Part 2 here
See Part 3 here

One of my greatest disappointments in life and in the human race is that so few men stand up for women. I've heard from two or three on this blog, private emails, mainly fathers of daughters or granddaughters, but you know what? I never hear from fathers of sons. And that says so much. Women need more men speaking out. Saying "I would never behave that way!" and moving on is just not enough. I have many "good" men in my life but they are silent. Where is the massive male outcry against these misogynistic paedophiles and sadists masquerading as the One True Church?

Maybe it's the old case of Irish people bowing to the masters and never standing up for what is right. The RC church has such an empowering grip on the male psyche enforcing the privilege of being male in this male-driven church. I ask myself: Why on earth would they want to change? Why on earth would they want to fight within this male bastion of droit du seigneur and subsequently be called "pussy-whipped" or worse by their male cohorts?

Another unfortunate case of "I'm alright, Jack - fight for your own justice and equality, woman. But don't ask me to give up anything."


Meanwhile, A recent article shows that men's biggest fear is being laughed at by women while women's biggest fear is being killed by men. Isn't there loads to think about in that one sentence?


The Brehon Laws,long before the arrival of the mythical Saint Patrick to Ireland declared women as fully equal and could inherit and lead. Needless to mention, this was all abolished under the mighty males of Rome. Power and endless propagation being the driver. Forget those stupid Brehon Laws where men and women were equal and Ireland had the most advanced justice system for its time. Where there were no prisons, no crime. And restorative justice prevailed. Yes, there were flaws, but early Christianity brainwashing must have felt severely threatened by such female freedoms. Men's rights to regulate our bodies and what we do with them still prevails.

And yeah, I caught that article in the Irish Times about Ireland being closer to Muslim teachings that anywhere else in the world.

I only have to think of the shame of Savita to realize that nothing has changed in the country of my birth.

To be continued.


10 comments:

  1. A lot going on
    here by the woods.
    Not up to sharing
    but
    always read your words.
    Meaningful
    to this one...

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  2. My mother often spoke of her parents' abasement before God and the Church. She found it disgusting.

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  3. I'm going to call that post number 2 read today from Irish women who are ffu (freaking fed up). It is in the zeigeist and I just brought home Philomena from the library. gaaaah!
    I will talk to my dear guy, father of one boy, one girl and see what he has to say. He is quiet about everything though. Must be the Inuit in him. He never loved any church so has no heartbreak there. I mystify him with my Buddhist ways but he is more than tolerant. My best pal and I would talk about a connection of women across the land who would be tipped one day by some stupid male decision into starting the running women screaming relay - a voice screeched across the land in pure unadulterated fury - no polemic, no threats, just a song of bitter truth. 14 year olds must have dressed to invite rape, the planet must deserve to be ruined, and man must be able to get up from the biggest mad hatter's tea party and move on to the clean place at the table with no blame.

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  4. I am sure that the historical Jesus had nothing at all like it in mind of what has become of his teachings in the male dominated and perverted Catholic church. Any child even as feebleminded as a 5 year old could tell you that. I don't think you need a philosophy degree to understand that problem. Women aid and abet in this church and its teachings, and are silly adorers and brides of Christ. They have just as much to answer for.

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  5. Well, I've never had anything to do with the Catholic church or any other churches, so I don't think I can do much for the female victims of all these sick religions. I'm baffled as to why Catholicism has any supporters left, given the constant scandals of recent years. Why don't people just follow their own instincts rather than submitting to some intractable, male-dominated dogma?

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  6. Dad of two daughters, and one son, I'll respond.
    My son, Henry, was born between the two girls. He's 29 now.
    He's currently going to university, undergrad.
    He was raised among women, strong daughters, strong relatives.
    Always his own self, he grew tall, slender, no interest in athletics, he tended to history and philosophy.
    I've rarely heard him use a word that would offend a evangelical baptist...
    He joined the army at 19, confusing everyone. His mother compared it to Eisenhower's mother,saying she shed bitter tears.
    Further, he got in the rangers, a special operations branch, and spent 3 years in Iraq and Afghanistan.
    He's a guy now that physically you'd move over for...big shoulders, looks like someone you'd hope help your.
    In all he's experienced, he remains the guy who looks at women like equals, people, just like him.
    My point I guess is there are men out there like us. Maybe a minority, but it's gonna increase.
    As MLK said, it's not fast enough, it's not soon enough.
    Apologies, not much else I can offer, bit we're trying, best we can.

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  7. I'm happy to say that both my sons identify as feminists and see women as their equals. I'd liek to take all the credit for that, but I have to admit that their feminist father helped.

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  8. I'm happy to say that both my sons identify as feminists and see women as their equals. I'd liek to take all the credit for that, but I have to admit that their feminist father helped.

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  9. My beautiful mother was raped as a girl and nothing was done because of the shame (Irish father). My youngest maternal aunt was required, as a girl, to go look after her dead sister's children, and her brother-in-law repeatedly raped her. The dead sister had birth problems, and the husband chose the child over his wife when only one could be saved (Catholic). We found out about the repeated rape only near the end of my aunt's life. We had always wondered why she had not married. All three of my sisters and I have been victims of male violence. It never ends. The shame of it all prevents many of us from doing something about it, especially when we know the law is not going to do much if we report it. A short sentence is not worth having everyone, including your kids, know forever what happened. All of the rhetoric about how the woman should not feel shame because she is the victim will not convince all women to report abuse. This I know to be true.

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  10. You should put all your (excellent) parts together and get them published or at least have a separate section on your blog.

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