Thursday, December 08, 2022

Forever and Todo.

 An enormous word, isn't it? I was having a deep think today which involved old age, death, priorities and gripes, groans and geezerdoms.

Mainly though, there is never enough time to do all I set out to do in a day. My todo (pronounced toe-dough) lists are lengthy and spill over to the next week and beyond. What part of a todo do I kick to the curb when I want to complete all of it?



I reflect on my bestie Helen, whose wake was held at her house and her last unfinished book was propped up beside her - we shared a voracious habit of reading and exchanged books all the time, even though I was in Canada and she was in Ireland.

I think this is a great idea for readers who eventually die, the bookcase converts into your casket:



The point is, the unfinished business of what we leave behind, and how poignant is it?

I envision my own forever unfinished business: several novels, a memoir, three pieces of knitting with promises attached, a large piece of red felt awaiting embroidery, the relics of my once enormous collection of old movies (5,000?) - most now given away, but....journals - most now destroyed, but....design books of ideas waiting for actualization.... For who's to tell when the Grim Reaper comes calling? 

So it all ends up in the dump. Forever. And that's not a good thought, not from a vanity point of view but because of pollution and our cast away lives winding up in the oceans, etc. Never more of a crisis than now. Or if one burns the lot of it then, boy, green house gases and plastic crap in the air.



I try staying awake and trying to fulfil all my todos. But being a geezer, as I am, I nod off in the most unflattering of ways. If you are old and honest, you know what I'm saying. Chin drool, startling awake in an odd place, orienting oneself, looking at a clock and wondering where the last 2 hours went. My father in his time denied he was asleep mid-afternoon but told me, snottily, he was "giving his eyes a rest."

So my eyes need a rest most days. Unless I am over-caffeinated, then watch out.



13 comments:

  1. Ouch. This hit home.
    I always ensure that there is at least one thing on my to do list I know I can cross off - and can then feel I have achieved something.
    And our house is filled with far too many things which will mean nothing (other than inconvenience) to those left behind.

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    1. I do the same, EC and preen most unbecomingly. I look around my place and Le Sigh. Maybe a charity shop would enjoy and benefit from it all. Worth another deep think.....
      XO
      WWW

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  2. What you treasure very few others will and as EC says, it will be an inconvenience and probably cause feelings of guilt. The worst thing about dying is the loss of a lifetime's information gathering. We learn so much during our lives. We've experienced so much. We have some very good skills and yet it all goes to waste

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  3. ‘Just resting my eyes’…one of my father’s favourite sayings!

    Trouble with giving it all away (in one way or another) is I often wonder if the family will say/think…..’she didn’t do much in her life - have much in the way of material possessions did she’. They know otherwise but if there’s nothing left for them to actually see how will they and others in the future know. Weird I know- just me and my way of thinking.
    Meanwhile, there’s a whole lot of stuff in the boot of my car waiting to go to the op shop!

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  4. I've sent something to wisewebwoman. Emma

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  5. I gave away so much in my several downsizings that leaving much for the landfill won't happen. Now I have a knitting grandaughter, Laura the last, and that may take care of the last of my patterns. She's already tackling socks and telling me about the "magic loop" method because she doesn't like double pointed needles..

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  6. A bookcase that converts into a casket, how very ingenious! I imagine my unfinished business will be finished by Jenny, as she's 10 years younger and likely to survive me. What she does is entirely up to her.

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  7. Would a film school or archive like your movie collection? The bookcase casket is imminently practical unless you prefer cremation and yeah, losing a bestie sucks, Whatever I leave undone I need to make peace with now because I do not know what that will be and I will not be around to care. I work on my top three, leaving clear instructions, dispersing such as I keep and making sure someone takes the cat.

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  8. Good Heavens I'm one of (2) the oldest here and I haven't even given this topic a nano second of my time. This year I survived COVID vaccines--note, vaccines not Covid--to a new me but still here. Not even considering any of the rest of this topic. Go outside people. Emma.

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  9. Do people who want to move their have to have "medical" coverage beyond Canada Health? And, what if I just want to tour around there and soak in the beauty for about a year. Is this allowed? Are there apts to rent? Emma

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  10. I am quite happy in the knowledge that I will close my eyes for the last time with many unfinished projects. I am busy all the time, yet I don't have a to-do list as such. One of the very rewarding aspects of my life is that people will send me queries about birds, and sometimes other aspects of natural history or ecology, and that sets me off on a "research" path that can engage me for many happy hours. I hope it continues like this right to the very end. The other great asset is that I have remained ridiculously healthy and can still walk "forever" and lead groups in the exploration of nature, give public presentations and so on. All in all a great life. And if a glass of wine should be added to the mix that's all to the good!

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    1. This can end in a nod and did for me. Vaccine.Emma

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