Friday, July 05, 2019

Free Floating Fridays

It's great to write this when I have so much else screaming for my attention but here goes. A breath of relief in the midst of so many demands on my time today.

The rehearsals for the play are being scheduled, first one on Sunday night and I can't tell you how thrilling it all is to be looking forward to being back on the boards again. Grandgirl put a comment on my page on FB: "coolest grandma ever." High praise indeed but I think she's felt that way for a while, judging by her bragging to her friends when they compare grandparents. I think being open-minded and non-geezerish is the route to a successful grandparent-grandchild relationship. Plus seizing the opportunity to be a child again with a sense of wonder and joy. And avoiding phrases like "in my time" unless asked.

We are getting ready for press release event for the media for launching our Seniors Advocacy Group. Advocacy is a nice word. We are actually demanding rectification to the injustices and forcing accountability from these wealthy out of touch politicians. Such events are all about the "stories" and that's the part we are working on.

Obituaries: I've seen so many "sweet" ones here when it comes to women. How giving and uncomplaining and loving everyone they ever met and devoting themselves to family and baking. I'd rather die outrageous, unconventional and opinionated, thanks. I often think it's a matter of exposure to more choices as children, more opportunities to explore all aspects of ourselves rather than being confined to a narrow box of service to families. But if they're happy (are they, truly?) so be it. I know I chafe against "normal."

Now that I have physical challenges I find one of the hidden mental "jobs" I perform is accessing every place new for accessibility from the parking to the walking once I get there. I am astonished at how many places are off limits due to distance. Something one never notices when galloping around in optimum health.

I bought a lovely handmade cane when I was away recently, I think it adds a bit of class to the meandering me. I don't use it all the time but there are occasions when I've used up all my spoons in the previous 2 days and need it.






22 comments:

  1. That's a nice cane. David uses one now and then to get about, as he has crippling arthritis. Congrats on the opportunities in your life. Blessings.

    ReplyDelete
  2. Thank you Gigi, I feel truly blessed and so very grateful.

    XO
    WWW

    ReplyDelete
  3. When I read this I immediately thought of the poem by Mary Oliver, The Journey and, also, the poem, She Let Go by Saphire Rose. I try and read them every day. I, too, had to find my way and put "old voices" away in my head. I am married, mother of three and live on a farm and I manage to walk my own path. I see where that example has helped our girls to be strong women, also.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yes, we lead by example Judi. My mother and grandmother had no choices and I am so conscious of that. Their advice to me on my wedding day was never to let go of my music. I applied that to all aspects of my life. I love Mary Oliver.

      XO
      WWW

      Delete
  4. I hear you. I have some forearm crutches I use when my spoons are totally depleted. They are not nearly as elegant as your cane.
    Weird is just Wired (differently). I love that I am learning to accept 'my' normal that way. And love your positive relationship with your granddaughter.
    Good luck with your busyness. And take time for yourself.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks I'm trying to by breaking away from it periodically and just airing out my brain. I like weird is just wired. I think many bloggers are like this, throwing convention to the wind.

      XO
      WWW

      Delete
  5. Your comment on my journal blessed me - I feel as though for the first
    time I am me or still becoming me. Keep moving and doing what you are doing. Love my cane, started using at 80, guess I am lucky and now since heart attack a walker when needed or when I go outside to
    be among my flowers, outside here in the country a walker is better,
    The cane in the city.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. We are all just walking each other home dear Ernestine. No guarantees on how long one of us is walking and the other isn't. Just the moments. I struggle with that myself. Carry on is the best idea, right? I look at people in wheelchairs and complicated looking zimmer frames and think there but for the grace. Truly.
      XO
      WWW

      Delete
  6. I don't have a grandchild but I do my best to be open-minded and non-geezerish. There's nothing more tedious than some old codger who's stuck in the past and finds every new development objectionable.

    I'd also rather die outrageous, unconventional and opinionated. Service to your family is commendable, but surely there's more to life than that?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Exactly Nick and I would dispute "commendable" in that very few families appreciate those living martyrs except when they're dead and their work is absent. I'm reading a book about such women in the outports of Newfoundland in 1924 and the workload was unconscionable (along with non-stop breeding) while it is the men who are praised for being out there in their boats, no children sucking at their bodies while digging the fields for winter food.
      I do wish there was more recognition of such sheroes.

      XO
      WWW

      Delete
  7. Accessibility is my primo concern these days, to the extend of being a passenger and being dropped at the door. I am mastering the art of taking my cane whenever I leave a room.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It's a whole new chapter of life to be learned Joanne. I will probably need my cane on stage in this play I'm involved in. It actually might add to the part. Still driving thank goodness and accessible parking is my new lover.

      XO
      WWW

      Delete
  8. Like your fancy schmancy walking stick :)
    Wonderful to have your grandgirl think you are the bees knees.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I know, and I do love this walking stick, it is the perfect height and very light.

      XO
      WWW

      Delete
  9. I'm wondering if we might get better obituaries if we write our own. I have my mothers old walking stick, it's in the corner gathering dust, patiently waiting for the day when I might need it.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. What a lovely memento of your mother. Yes, I know a few who composed their own obits. I'm of two minds on it. As obits are surely for those left behind to comfort themselves or give a dose of reality to the deceased? I suppose consulting with the fam might be an idea before one's death?

      XO
      WWW

      Delete
  10. I endorse your grandgirl one hundred percent. My obituary has already been drafted by my very talented son. "He laughed his way to his death."

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Oh I love this Ramana. "Still laughing" might be another one, LOL.

      XO
      WWW

      Delete
  11. We still park way out in the lots. Or on back blocks when we go downtown. It's good exercise for us plus it allows the close-up parking places for those who cannot walk as well as we do.

    However, one big change now that Terry's blood pressure has been drastically lowered to help his heart heal. We can no longer park, open the doors, jump out and take off at a fast pace. Terry has to slowly rise from the car seat and stand for awhile before walking. He needs to let his body adjust to the change in position.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Adapting to change is challenging DKZ. I found the legs I took for granted for 10,000 years particularly challenging in their failure and decrepitude. A huge adjustment but I'm there I think and grateful for the blue spots and new wee shopping carts to lean on.
      XO
      WWW

      Delete
  12. Nice cane. I'd use that.

    I love your relationship with your granddaughter.

    ReplyDelete

Comments are welcome.

Email me at wisewebwomanatgmaildotcom if you're having trouble.